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. Last Updated: 07/27/2016

Car Bomb In Baghdad Kills 11

BAGHDAD -- A suicide car bomber killed at least 11 people in Baghdad on Thursday, a day after militants killed almost 200 in the capital's bloodiest day since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, despite an ongoing security crackdown.

Iraqis vented their anger at the Baghdad security plan, which has cut sectarian murders blamed on Shiite militias but failed to stop car bombings and other major attacks blamed on al-Qaida.

Police said a bomber rammed his car into a fuel tanker in the religiously mixed neighborhood of Jadriya on Thursday, also wounding 21 people.

Suspected Sunni al-Qaida militants detonated a string of bombs in mostly Shiite areas of Baghdad on Wednesday. In the worst attack, 140 people were killed in a truck bombing in the Sadriya neighborhood.

The U.S. military said Wednesday's blasts appeared to be the work of al-Qaida and were coordinated.

In Sadriya, angry residents cursed the Shiite-led government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki for failing to protect them. Smoke still billowed from the debris and sandals and glass littered the ground in Sadriya.

"The government is talking about the security plan but dozens of people are dying every day. No one is protecting us," said Sabah Haider, 42.

Rahim Ali, also in Sadriya, said: "The Americans say they are here to protect the Iraqi people but they are doing nothing."

The security plan calls for 30,000 extra U.S. troops and thousands of Iraqi soldiers to be deployed, mostly in Baghdad. While it has curbed militia murders, the car bombings have raised fears of a new outbreak of reprisals, especially among anti-U.S. Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr's al-Mahdi Army militia.

The al-Mahdi Army, blamed for widespread killings of Sunni Arabs after a Shiite shrine in Samarra was destroyed in February 2006, has kept a low profile during the crackdown.

Maliki said Wednesday that Iraqis would take security control of the whole country from foreign forces by the end of the year.