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. Last Updated: 07/27/2016

Muscovites Happy With Life: Survey

Beaten only by New York, Moscow is the most optimistic -- and in some respects the most grouchy -- city in 10 major metropolises in the United States and Europe, according to a new survey.

Some 41 percent of Moscow residents are content with the state of affairs in the capital, Jim Clifton, head of the Gallup Organization, which conducted the survey, said at a news conference in Moscow on Monday, RIA Novosti reported.

In comparison, 47 percent of New Yorkers are satisfied.

Gallup put 100 questions to 1,000 participants in the 10 cities that were surveyed. The cities included Prague, Warsaw, Bucharest and Budapest.

Clifton said the poll aimed to give mayors some objective information about how residents assess their work.

Five years ago, only 17 percent of Muscovites were happy about the city's state of affairs, he said.

Moscow residents topped their New York counterparts in at least one aspect -- they have a brighter outlook for the future. Sixty percent of Muscovites said they felt rosy about the city's economic prospects, compared to 57 percent of New Yorkers, the Finansoviye Izvestia newspaper reported Tuesday.

Some 27 percent of Muscovites said they would rather raise their children in Moscow than anywhere else.

In what Clifton called the grimmest numbers in the survey, only 9 percent of Moscow residents said they felt safe taking late-night walks and 13 percent praised medical services.

Nikolai Petrov, an analyst at the Carnegie Moscow Center, said the optimism reflects Moscow's privileged status in Russia. As the capital, Moscow has developed dynamically, "sometimes at the expense of the regions," he said.

Petrov, however, poured cold water over residents' rosy expectations. "It's the profits from high oil sales, eaten away here in Moscow, that create a feeling of a rewarding and beautiful life," he said. "But there's been no strategic change in the economy for the better."