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. Last Updated: 07/27/2016

29 Firms in World's Top 100 Economies

Power of the Purse
RankCountry/
Company
Value added*
($billions)
1United States9,810
2 Japan4,765
3Germany1,866
4Britain1,427
5France1,294
6China1,080
7Italy1,074
8Canada701
9Brazil 595
10 Mexico575
11Spain561
12S. Korea457
13India457
14Australia388
15Netherlands370
16Taiwan309
17Argentina285
18Russia251
...
44Chile71
45ExxonMobil63
46Pakistan62
47General Motors56
48Peru53
50New Zealand51
54Hungary46
55Ford Motor Co.44
56DaimlerChrysler42
57Nigeria41
58General Electric39
84Tunisia19
85Philip Morris19
86Slovakia19
87Croatia19
88Guatemala19
93Slovenia18
99GlaxoSmithKline17
100BT17
* GDP for countries and value added for multinational corporations. Value added is defined as the sum of salaries, pretax profits and depreciation and amortization.
Source: UNCTAD


GENEVA -- Twenty-nine of the world's 100 leading economic entities are companies, with the largest -- ExxonMobil -- bigger than the economy of Pakistan, a United Nations survey showed Monday.

Pakistan is a country of more than 141 million people, although just over half of those are of working age.

An ExxonMobil spokeswoman said the oil giant employed 95,000 staff worldwide.

Russia came 18th in the rating, between Argentina and Switzerland.

The UN Conference on Trade and Development measured "value added" -- comparing profit and wages at companies to the economic output of countries -- and ranked ExxonMobil 45th on the list, with value added of $63 billion.

It found that General Motors is bigger than New Zealand, while Nigeria is slotted between DaimlerChrysler and General Electric.

Tobacco company Philip Morris, with value added of $19 billion, is on a par with Tunisia, Slovakia and Guatemala, UNCTAD said.

The figures show that the relative importance of the top 100 companies is on the rise, with their value-added activities accounting for 4.3 percent of world gross domestic product in 2000 compared with 3.5 percent in 1990.

"In general, the top companies are growing at a faster rate than countries," UNCTAD spokesman Miguel Perez-Ludena said.

He said the aim of the survey was to enter into the global debate about whether such corporations were bigger than countries. It had used the value-added mechanism to provide a more accurate calculation because most other surveys measure corporate size in terms of sales or foreign assets.

"Companies are not as large as they would be if we were using sales, but they are still large enough to create more value added than whole countries, even large countries like Pakistan and Nigeria," Perez-Ludena said.

UNCTAD gave no comparative figures.

Leonid Grigoryev, an expert with the Institute of World Economics and International Relations at the Russian Academy of Sciences, said that the value-added mechanism of comparison painted a realistic picture.

"The global and social responsibility of the president of a major international corporation should be very high," Grigoryev said.

"Often more depends on his decision than the decision of the president of a country with voting rights in the United Nations," he added.

The top 44 spots in the survey were all occupied by countries.

(Reuters, Vedomosti)