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. Last Updated: 07/27/2016

A Bright Moment in America's Darkest Hour

Editor,


I am an American and the parent of a beautiful little boy adopted from Samara on July 4, 2000. Russia's support is extra special to my family and is something I am so very proud of. We loved our visits to Russia last year and have told everyone we know, since returning with our son, that Russia is a wonderful place and a country with genuinely nice, caring and loving people. Russia's support during this time of tragedy for our country has proven every word I have spoken about the Russian people. I have seen the pictures of flowers at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, and it brings tears to my eyes. We are so proud of our son's Russian heritage. Russia is a nation of great individuals.

Trista Ehlers
Alabama



Editor,


Although I am largely a Bush supporter, I do feel that he has been somewhat hot-headed and heavy-handed with Russia -- particularly in regard to the ABM Treaty, which is an important issue to Russia. In spite of that, Russia has shown no hesitation in its support for the United States in the wake of the World Trade Center tragedy. I wish to express my sincere gratitude to a noble and compassionate people.

John Marco Panettiere
Allentown, Pennsylvania



Editor,


I am a construction worker, an average American citizen, writing to all Russians who share the grief we feel over loss of life in our country. I, as well as every American, realize that many nations have lost good citizens, good souls. We pray for them all. The outpouring of grief and prayers from the great Russian nation has given all Americans not only comfort in this time of tragedy, but has renewed a bond of brotherhood between our two peoples. We appreciate so much the help that President Putin and all of Russia has offered.

As a child of the Cold War, I have prayed many times that our two great nations could bond together for the good of each other and the world. We are now brothers and sisters in grief. Let us become brothers and sisters in life, as it was intended. We Americans have a deep respect for Russian citizens' pride and patriotism. This is our common bond as well. With this understanding of the citizens' pride in Russia, it has been profoundly moving to watch as the great Russian nation and its citizens mourn with us.

We thank you so much, and are filled with pride that we two peoples now can stand shoulder to shoulder to again vanquish a common foe.

Bruce Pitchford
Kansas City, Missouri



Editor,


I just wanted to say that the words and show of support from Russia have been very heartwarming. All that has come between us over the last three or four years makes it all the more special. It shows that we can put our differences aside and come together to work as one. When this happens, nothing like what happened Tuesday can ever happen again to any country in the world. The missile defense issue can be worked out; the Balkan issue can be worked out; these issues are very trivial and should not be allowed to spoil the relationship we have now. As other readers have already said, God bless Russia and God bless the Russian people.

David Price,
North Carolina



Editor,


As a New Yorker, I send my heartfelt thanks to all those in Russia sending their prayers and sympathy to the Americans.

Johnette W. Beacham
New York



Editor,


As I read the weekend edition of The Moscow Times, I was so deeply moved in a spirit of gratitude to the Russian people as they expressed love and compassion, "in honor of the victims of Tuesday's terror attacks." It is my deep hope and prayer that law-abiding, peace-loving people around the world will unite to remove the scourge of hate, injustice and intolerance from the face of the globe. As a consequence of this righteous unity, may a broad and all-encompassing spirit of love and respect for human rights make this world safe, just, free and prosperous for all peoples of all nations. I send this with deepest thanks and respect for the good people of Russia.

The Reverend Ronald Nybroten
New Glarus, Wisconsin



Editor,


I am a second-generation American of Russian descent. Over the past decade, I have been to Russia often, most recently in May to lecture at Moscow State University. I have felt a great kinship with the Russian people I have met during those visits. I am immensely gratified, though not surprised, by the outpouring of support and regard from Russians in this moment of America's travail. With my grandparents in mind, I am proud to say that Russia's history is my history too, and that Russia is my country too. Thank you, Russia, for your great and characteristic compassion.

Martin B. Gold
Washington



Editor,


I am a Black American citizen and I saw the response of President Vladimir Putin following the attacks on America. I wanted to say to the Russian people that I was touched deeply by his words and I'm proud of their great president. I wish someday Russia would become one of our allies to help keep peace in the world. After all, we are all God's children. No matter what people around the world think about blacks and whites in America, we're like an average family anywhere in the world. You know how it is if you had a brother or sister growing up with you in your childhood days. You might attack him/her, or he/she might attack you, but if someone attacked either one of you, they had to deal with both of you. We're like that here in America, one big family when we're attacked. I want to say thank you to all Muscovites and other Russians who showed their support to American victims and their families. The people of Moscow should know that all Americans are aware of the prayers and good wishes that have come from Moscow and we say: Thank you and God bless you and your country.

Bill Hankston
Beaumont,Texas



Editor,


Seeing the tears in the eyes of crowds of Russian people laying flowers at the wall of the U.S. Embassy made me cry myself. I would like to offer a heartfelt thank-you to the people of Russia for their offering at a time of need in my country. God bless Russia.

Scott Andrews
Texas



Editor,


I, like others who have written to you, am an average American. I am an air traffic controller who lives and works in San Diego, California, 3,000 miles from where the disaster of recent days took place. Like all Americans and others throughout the world, I am emotionally affected by the tragic events of Sept. 11. I have been very impressed by the support and sensitivity of the people in Russia and in other countries around the globe. I wanted to let you know how profoundly grateful I am to know that the people of Russia feel as touched about what has happened as we do. I have suddenly felt a kinship with the Russian people that I had not felt before, and for that I am sorry. It has been enlightening to rediscover that we are all God's children and that we are all caring, feeling human beings. To all those who share in our grief, thank you. Thank you for feeling our pain and for providing emotional and other support. God be with you and bless you all.

Tim Quinlan
San Diego, California



Editor,


I am an American citizen who, like so many others here in the United States, has been horrified and saddened by this week's events. My wife and I have a wonderful son Nicholas, 2, whom we adopted in Russia in 2000. He is our joy. As an American and the parent of a Russian-born son, I feel tremendous gratitude for the actions of President Putin and to the Russian people for their offers of help. I know I am forever linked to the Russian people because of my son and of that I am glad. But I now feel even closer to Russians all over the world. Thank you, Russia for your offer of help. It is appreciated and needed.

Phillip Tutor
Anniston, Alabama



Editor,


I was one of the 250,000 people stranded hundreds of miles from my loved ones by the shutdown of U.S. airlines caused by the attack on the World Trade Center. I traveled for days listening to the radio during my trip home. As I traveled, I heard of the reaction of the Russian people and military.

After reaching home, I heard from friends of e-mails pouring in from Russia with condolences and support. I can't tell you how much it warmed my heart, and there are no words I could express to your readers regarding my appreciation.

Bill Damron
United States



Editor,


I want to thank Russia and the Russian people so much for your sympathies and concern for Americans and the tragedy which has occurred. When I read the article and saw the pictures of Russian people laying flowers at the gates of the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, I cried. ... Thank you so much and God bless you all.

Robert Tuck
Oregon



Editor,


This is a message for the great people of Russia: There are times when one must count one's friends. How comforting and reassuring it is to see that not only has Russia stood to be counted as a friend of the United States, but that you were among the first to do so.

John Miesner
Manhattan, Kansas



Editor,


When we were attacked by terrorists, it was the saddest day of my life. Now after today seeing Russian flags flying at half-mast and seeing the tears in Russian people's eyes, it is the happiest day of my life. I never ever thought our peoples should be adversaries. ... I wanted also to offer the Russian people my condolences for the loss of life they suffered in New York and in other acts of terrorism against their people.

Robert Gormely
Lakebay, Washington



Editor,


I am a college student in the United States, and both my father and mother and most of my brothers and sisters are at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow. I just wanted to thank the Russian people for all of the support that they have shown the American people, both in Russia and at home. As you can probably guess, the horror of the events has caused American hearts to falter, and every heart goes out to the families suffering around the country. I shed tears every day as I watch the tragedy that lingers over so many Americans heads, but it does calm my nerves to know that my family is safe, consoled by your country's support. Thank you to the people of Russia.

Mary Woodworth
Arizona



Editor,


I am a high school student. I am just an ordinary American who lives an ordinary life, who is ordinarily only affected by those events around me. Yet when the tragic events of Sept. 11 took place, my life, and the lives of all Americans, became anything but ordinary. ... But when I look at the international community, and in particular, the citizens of Russia, I derive hope. I draw strength from Russia's spirit, and I now have a new confidence in humanity. As inhuman as these attacks may be, if former enemies can join together to search out and eradicate a common foe, then all sense of purpose may not be lost. I thank the people of Russia for their support, for their prayers and for their effort, as a part of our effort to return to a simple, ordinary life.

Anthony DeAngelo
Homestead, Florida



Editor,


Thanks for your coverage of events in the United States last week. I especially appreciated the letters from Americans to Russia and Russians. It helps fulfill one of my long-cherished hopes that Americans and Russians would once again find themselves appreciating each other and working together. I was a school child during World War II, and I feel great appreciation for the huge sacrifices and magnificent fortitude of the Russian people during that period in particular. It was a shock to me that we became apparent adversaries later during the so-called Cold War. I have never believed there was much animosity between the people of our two nations. I am glad to see that lie being laid to rest.

Maurice W. Wildin
Albuquerque



Editor,


I just want to thank all of my fellow citizens for the support and encouragement expressed with regard to our terrible tragedy. I am a citizen of both countries and therefore am proud twice as much of the heroism, compassion and support which is absolutely endless and boundless. ... God bless all of you.

Natalia Lobanova
New York



Editor,


I want to express my sincere gratitude to all the Russian people for their sincere show of grief during our hours of darkness here in America. I am not surprised by this, because I have come to know the Russian people as warm, caring and very open. I look forward to visiting the Krasnodar region next summer to see my wife's family. This will be my third trip, and I am always amazed by how friendly everyone has been. Russia has, of course, seen its own share of terrorist activity in recent years. To receive your support has been a bright moment in this otherwise dark time in our history. To all the Russian people who have expressed their support, from President Putin to the people in the smallest of villages, I say thank you from the bottom of my heart.

Michael L. Weaver
Ephrata, Pennsylvania



Editor,


Please convey to the citizens of the great country of Russia our deep appreciation and gratitude for their compassion in this, our darkest hour as a nation. May God bless them all for their kindness and compassion. The only good to come out of this tragedy so far is the outpouring of care and concern by our neighbors in the world. Our leaders may have had their differences in the past, but we are all people loved by God. I hope to visit Russia one day in the near future to say thank you in person. As we mourn the thousands of innocent civilian men, women and children lost in this senseless act of violence, Russia's prayers and thoughts warm our hearts. God bless America and Russia.

Mr. and Mrs. Alan Holmes
Flint, Michigan



Editor,


I am an American living in China. Although I have studied Russian history and language in the United States, I now find myself living in China. The events of Sept. 11 will live in the hearts of Americans for many years to come. This, however, is also a wake-up call for fellow Americans. The Russian people have been subjected to this same violence for many years and have gathered very little sympathy from the international community. ... I would like to express my extreme gratitude for the understanding of the Russian people. U.S.-Russian relations are pock-marked with ill will and misunderstanding, but this is our countries' chance to bury all past grievances and start to understand each other as world citizens, not as past enemies.

An American in China