Install

Get the latest updates as we post them — right on your browser

. Last Updated: 07/27/2016

Americans Finish First In Global Sex Survey

WELLINGTON, New Zealand-- The United States remains the sexual superpower of the world, with Americans making love more often and with more partners than any other nationality, according to a survey by a leading condom manufacturer.

Durex SSL International said Tuesday that its annual poll of 18,500 people in 28 countries showed the world was having more sex and starting earlier than ever before, and the United States was leading the field in all departments.

The survey -- carried out in May and published ahead of World Aids Day on Dec. 1 -- showed respondents averaging sex 97 times a year, up from 96 last year.

But those Americans questioned averaged sex 124 times a year with over 14 different partners and were also starting earlier than anyone else at an average age of 16. The Greeks made love the second most frequently -- 117 times a year on average -- while the Germans were the second youngest to get started at 16.6 years.

France's reputation as a nation of lovers took something of a hit with frequency dropping from 121 times a year to 110 and slumping from top of the number of partners table to second with 13 compared to 17 a year ago.

Overall, 60 percent of respondents said they had sex at least once a week and 4 percent claimed to make love daily.

But single people had the least sex -- 86 times a year -- and the libido of married couples (100 times) also trailed those living together (145 times).

One in 10 people said they never had sex.

The global average age of first sex moved down slightly to 18.0 years from 18.1, while the number of partners dropped to 7.7 from 8.2.

Men appeared to be more sexually active than women, claiming a frequency of 102 times a year against 91. Men also claimed an average 10.7 partners, versus 4.6 for women.

Almost a third of all people said they had been faithful to one partner, while 16 percent claimed more than 10 partners.