Install

Get the latest updates as we post them — right on your browser

. Last Updated: 07/27/2016

Masha i Medvedi, Tequilajazzz Top Fuzz Awards for Best Hits




ST. PETERSBURG -- "My name is Viktor Sologub and I f*** anybody who throws cans at me!" yells the front man of the electronic band Deadushki, after he has survived one of several volleys of flying trash. The Yubileiny Sports Palace was full Saturday night f between 8,000 and 9,000 fans shouting, waving their arms and chucking empty beer cans. They were all there to see the annual Fuzz Awards celebrate the best of new Russian rock.


Deadushki started playing their trendy drum 'n' bass rhythms, complete with computers and live DJ, two years ago. They were nominated for the best new group category this year, despite being formed by a couple of aging rockers who are both over 40.


In the end, though, they were squeezed out by the younger generation f Moscow-based pop rock act Masha i Medvedi, fronted by 21-year-old Masha Makarova.


The five-hour ceremony was introduced by the face of Russian MTV, Tutta Larsen. Apart from Masha, awards also went to Tequilajazzz for best song ("Winter Sun"), to Spleen for best album ("Granite Album"), while the remaining two, rather predictably, went to Mumy Troll for best video ("Dolphins") and best group. In the absence of Troll, the trophies were handed to the band's spokesman Alexander Kushnir.


The Fuzz award f a 1.5 kilogram bronze figure in the shape of the "forte" music symbol, costing between $70 and $80 to make f are the 1996 brainchild of Alexander Dolgov, editor of Fuzz, once a semi-underground rag and now a glossy mag.


"Music awards are given out [by magazines] everywhere in the world," Dolgov said. "Considering that our publication is so far the only one of its kind in Russia, it was only natural for us to start this event in order to follow what's happening on the domestic rock scene."


"We counted on new names, new stars f bands that we have heard in the last two years and whose popularity is still growing," Dolgov said. "We have never had rock veterans who have been playing for more than 10 years on the bill, like Akvarium, Alisa or DDT."


The Russian rock map, according to Fuzz, has been completely redrawn.


"Perestroika rock" is out, the new mainstream is in. Ideology in music is passe, and the emphasis is on the quality pop product.