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. Last Updated: 07/27/2016

Boeing, Airbus Spar Over Sales

FARNBOROUGH, England -- Europe's Airbus Industrie on Tuesday announced $3 billion worth of new orders and traded insults with U.S. giant Boeing Co. over who sold the most planes.


The spat between the two archrivals dominated Farnborough, one of the world's largest air shows, where bulging order books showed the industry had bounced back from recession.


The European consortium accused Boeing of playing fast and loose with market share figures. Boeing insisted it was still overall leader.


The two also came to verbal blows over sales forecasts and cost estimates for a new generation of "superjumbo" jets planned by Airbus in its battle to break the Boeing monopoly.


Boeing enlivened the show Monday by announcing a $6.36 billion package of plane sales. Airbus fired back on Tuesday with orders for 44 planes around the world from North America to South Korea.


Sales at Farnborough are already three times bigger than they were at the last show in 1994.


Airbus' top order was for 18 A321 short-haul aircraft from South Korea's Asiana, a new customer for Airbus that could produce other multibillion-dollar sales.


International transport company Federal Express Corp. took 11 A300-600 freighter aircraft, Hong Kong's Cathay Pacific bought three more ultra long-range A340-300's and the German airline Condor agreed to buy 12 A320 type planes, although the latter awaits full Condor approval.


Boeing and Airbus fell out over how strong the market was for "superjumbos" that could take up to 700 passengers.


Airbus, eager to loosen Boeing's big plane monopoly, is bidding to deliver by the year 2003 its own plane, the A3XX, that would carry 560 passengers.


Its forecasts show that 25 percent of all airline revenues in the next 20 years will come from large-capacity planes as airports become more congested and runway space is at a premium.


Boeing, mulling plans to develop its range from the current 747-400 jumbo jet and move up to 500 and 600 stretch versions, says the market is not big enough for its rival to justify developing a new plane.