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. Last Updated: 07/27/2016

City Hymn: Same Song, New Tune

Weary of the Western cultural invasion, the Moscow government is trying to revive"My Moscow," a lyrical song with a marching refrain, proclaims:


"The enemy will never make/You bow your head in submission/My dear capital, my golden Moscow!"


The song dates from 1941, when the Nazis were 40 kilometers away from Moscow. According to a law passed by city deputies in July, the anthem will be played at all official welcome and farewell ceremonies for representatives of foreign countries, and at city flag-raisings. It will open and close Moscow City Duma sessions. And, starting in September, the Moscow channel will begin and end its broadcasting day with the strains of the new Moscow anthem.


Some object that the song is too outdated. At the least, the choice reflects the conservatism of the Moscow government, which has resorted to the well-worn Soviet tactic of using the Great Patriotic War to rally citizens.


City deputies decided to drop the last couplet, however, which includes an affectionate reference to Stalin:


The sun of our victory has risen over Moscow,


Good morning, city of great power


Where our dear Stalin lives!


We'll always be proud of you,


And your glory will live for centuries,


My dear capital, my golden Moscow!


To give the old song an updated spin, the city appointed a popular young performer, Julian Vasiliyev, better known as "Julian," to sing the anthem.


"I think the words of the song are just wonderful," said Julian, 22. "The song is about love for Moscow and heroic deeds accomplished here. The second part is all lyrical and tells about Moscow groves and bridges, Red Square and the striking of the Kremlin clock. What's wrong with that?"


He said the choice was a brilliant move by Mayor Yury Luzhkov. "For the first time the anthem wasn't imposed upon people. Instead, a song sincerely loved by everyone was chosen," said the performer, whose repertoire includes many well-loved Russian oldies.


With his long, curly locks, aura of French cologne and hip black sunglasses, Julian cuts a sharply different figure from previous performers of national anthems, who were noted for their military carriage and were honored with the title of "People's Artist." Julian's pretty-boy appearance and easy-listening style seems to appeal to both the new Russians and the older Soviet set.


He is known as a favorite of the presidential couple, and he was the only pop singer invited by President Boris Yeltsin to perform before Queen Elizabeth II during her visit to Russia.


"To be in the president's favor is not bad at all," Julian said. "But I don't want the anthem to play a particular role in my career."


Ironically, the official performer of the Moscow anthem is not a native Muscovite. Julian hails from Kolomna, southeast of Moscow. He launched his career three years ago with the song "Russian Waltz," and since then has released two compact discs, three tapes and one record. He will travel to the United States in November for concerts in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Atlantic City.


In his repertoire, Julian sings mostly of love and parting, but some of his material touches upon social problems, such as poverty and inequality.


"I am singing for everyone, for democrats and communists, for the poor and the rich," Julian said.By Irina Dmitrieva


THE MOSCOW TIMES


Weary of the Western cultural invasion, the Moscow government is trying to revive a sense of patriotism by borrowing a World War II song as the city's anthem.


"My Moscow," a lyrical song with a marching refrain, proclaims:


"The enemy will never make/You bow your head in submission/My dear capital, my golden Moscow!"


The song dates from 1941, when the Nazis were 40 kilometers away from Moscow. According to a law passed by city deputies in July, the anthem will be played at all official welcome and farewell ceremonies for representatives of foreign countries, and at city flag-raisings. It will open and close Moscow City Duma sessions. And, starting in September, the Moscow channel will begin and end its broadcasting day with the strains of the new Moscow anthem.


Some object that the song is too outdated. At the least, the choice reflects the conservatism of the Moscow government, which has resorted to the well-worn Soviet tactic of using the Great Patriotic War to rally citizens.


City deputies decided to drop the last couplet, however, which includes an affectionate reference to Stalin:


The sun of our victory has risen over Moscow,


Good morning, city of great power


Where our dear Stalin lives!


We'll always be proud of you,


And your glory will live for centuries,


My dear capital, my golden Moscow!


To give the old song an updated spin, the city appointed a popular young performer, Julian Vasiliyev, better known as "Julian," to sing the anthem.


"I think the words of the song are just wonderful," said Julian, 22. "The song is about love for Moscow and heroic deeds accomplished here. The second part is all lyrical and tells about Moscow groves and bridges, Red Square and the striking of the Kremlin clock. What's wrong with that?"


He said the choice was a brilliant move by Mayor Yury Luzhkov. "For the first time the anthem wasn't imposed upon people. Instead, a song sincerely loved by everyone was chosen," said the performer, whose repertoire includes many well-loved Russian oldies.


With his long, curly locks, aura of French cologne and hip black sunglasses, Julian cuts a sharply different figure from previous performers of national anthems, who were noted for their military carriage and were honored with the title of "People's Artist." Julian's pretty-boy appearance and easy-listening style seems to appeal to both the new Russians and the older Soviet set.


He is known as a favorite of the presidential couple, and he was the only pop singer invited by President Boris Yeltsin to perform before Queen Elizabeth II during her visit to Russia.


"To be in the president's favor is not bad at all," Julian said. "But I don't want the anthem to play a particular role in my career."


Ironically, the official performer of the Moscow anthem is not a native Muscovite. Julian hails from Kolomna, southeast of Moscow. He launched his career three years ago with the song "Russian Waltz," and since then has released two compact discs, three tapes and one record. He will travel to the United States in November for concerts in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and AtlanticBy Irina Dmitrieva


THE MOSCOW TIMES


Weary of the Western cultural invasion, the Moscow government is trying to revive a sense of patriotism by borrowing a World War II song as the city's anthem.


"My Moscow," a lyrical song with a marching refrain, proclaims:


"The enemy will never make/You bow your head in submission/My dear capital, my golden Moscow!"


The song dates from 1941, when the Nazis were 40 kilometers away from Moscow. According to a law passed by city deputies in July, the anthem will be played at all official welcome and farewell ceremonies for representatives of foreign countries, and at city flag-raisings. It will open and close Moscow City Duma sessions. And, starting in September, the Moscow channel will begin and end its broadcasting day with the strains of the new Moscow anthem.


Some object that the song is too outdated. At the least, the choice reflects the conservatism of the Moscow government, which has resorted to the well-worn Soviet tactic of using the Great Patriotic War to rally citizens.


City deputies decided to drop the last couplet, however, which includes an affectionate reference to Stalin:


The sun of our victory has risen over Moscow,


Good morning, city of great power


Where our dear Stalin lives!


We'll always be proud of you,


And your glory will live for centuries,


My dear capital, my golden Moscow!


To give the old song an updated spin, the city appointed a popular young performer, Julian Vasiliyev, better known as "Julian," to sing the anthem.


"I think the words of the song are just wonderful," said Julian, 22. "The song is about love for Moscow and heroic deeds accomplished here. The second part is all lyrical and tells about Moscow groves and bridges, Red Square and the striking of the Kremlin clock. What's wrong with that?"


He said the choice was a brilliant move by Mayor Yury Luzhkov. "For the first time the anthem wasn't imposed upon people. Instead, a song sincerely loved by everyone was chosen," said the performer, whose repertoire includes many well-loved Russian oldies.


With his long, curly locks, aura of French cologne and hip black sunglasses, Julian cuts a sharply different figure from previous performers of national anthems, who were noted for their military carriage and were honored with the title of "People's Artist." Julian's pretty-boy appearance and easy-listening style seems to appeal to both the new Russians and the older Soviet set.


He is known as a favorite of the presidential couple, and he was the only pop singer invited by President Boris Yeltsin to perform before Queen Elizabeth II during her visit to Russia.


"To be in the president's favor is not bad at all," Julian said. "But I don't want the anthem to play a particular role in my career."


Ironically, the official performer of the Moscow anthem is not a native Muscovite. Julian hails from Kolomna, southeast of Moscow. He launched his career three years ago with the song "Russian Waltz," and since then has released two compact discs, three tapes and one record. He will travel to the United States in November for concerts in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles and Atlantic City.


In his repertoire, Julian sings mostly of love and parting, but some of his material touches upon social problems, such as poverty and inequality.


"I am singing for everyone, for democrats and communists, for the poor and the rich," Julian said. City.


In his repertoire, Julian sings mostly of love and parting, but some of his material touches upon social problems, such as poverty and inequality.


"I am singing for everyone, for democrats and communists, for the poor and the rich," Julian said.