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. Last Updated: 07/27/2016

Martinas Young and Old Score Victories

ZURICH, Switzerland -- If a torch is going to be passed, this will be the place.


Martina Navratilova, at 37 the tennis circuit's oldest and most successful female player, and Martina Hingis, at 14 the brightest star of her generation, both advanced to the second round of the $750,000 European Indoors tennis tournament in matches Tuesday.


But while Navratilova struggled and admitted she was weary of the game that has earned her nearly $20 million and 167 singles titles, Hingis sparkled in her debut as a professional player.


"You wouldn't be here if Martina wasn't playing," a philosophical Navratilova said after her 7-5, 4-6, 6-1 victory over fellow American Ann Grossman.


"People didn't come to see me play. They've been watching me for more than 20 years." She was only half joking.


Hingis seemed in awe.


"She's a unique player," she said of Navratilova, who will play her last tournament next year. "She's achieved so much, no one else could do it."


In other matches Tuesday, Zina Garrison, the No. 4 seed from the United States, defeated Karina Habsudova of the Czech Republic, 7-6 (7-4), 2-6, 6-2.


American Lisa Raymond overcame Kristie Boogert of the Netherlands 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (7-1), and third-seeded Natalia Zvereva of Belarus beat Ukrainian Natalia Medvedeva 6-3, 7-6 (14-12).


With Hingis' 6-4, 6-3 defeat over Patty Fendick of the United States, the youngster proved that she had the baseline strength to outhit her opponent and the maturity to withstand a barrage of questions at a packed press conference.


"I prepared myself well and I've beaten better players than her," she said of Fendick. Hingis won the French Open Junior Girls' title in 1993 at age 12, breaking Jennifer Capriati's record as the youngest ever victor.


But Navratilova, who said she did not make an impact on the tennis scene until she was 15 years old, said she disapproves of early starts because of the emotional pressure and the physical dangers to growing bones.


"If I had a child I probably wouldn't want her to play on the tour at 14," she said.