Articles by Rose Gottemoeller



Fighting Pirates Instead of the United States

Dmitry Medvedev, who returned not long ago from Venezuela, has a serious choice to make. He can choose the Barbary pirates or the Monroe Doctrine. If I were him, I'd go with the pirates.

Is Obama or McCain Better for Russia?

If Barack Obama is elected U.S. president on Tuesday, he will join President Dmitry Medvedev in becoming the first post-baby boom leader of his country. Both men were born in the 1960s -- well after the tumultuous post- World War II decade, when the United States and Soviet Union were preoccupied with nuclear arms races and a deep divide in Europe.

One Way to Save the Relationship

For anyone who cares deeply about U.S.-Russian relations, events in Georgia are a great tragedy, as they are for the inhabitants of the region -- the Ossetians, Abkhaz, Georgians and Russians alike.

No Softer Than Putin

Dmitry Medvedev is being inaugurated as president at a fascinating time. For one thing, so many of his colleagues in the world leadership are moving up, down or out. Among the Group of Eight countries alone, the trend is remarkable.

Saving the Relationship

After President Vladimir Putin said last month that Russia would not allow other countries ""to poke their snotty noses into our affairs,"" we should face the fact that security relations with the West are in a shambles. Putin, who is fond of tough-guy slang, used the colorful phrase when he accused the United States of pushing the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe to decide against sending observers to the State Duma elections on Dec. 2.

Saving the Relationship

After President Vladimir Putin said last month that Russia would not allow other countries ""to poke their snotty noses into our affairs,"" we should face the fact that security relations with the West are in a shambles. Putin, who is fond of tough-guy slang, used the colorful phrase when he accused the United States of pushing the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe to decide against sending observers to the State Duma elections on Dec. 2.

The Nuclear Gambit with Iran

When President Vladimir Putin was in Tehran last week, one image from the trip was indelible: Putin meeting with Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei while President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad sat in the corner of the sofa.

Making the North a Secure Offer

As the six parties in the talks with North Korea over its nuclear policy declare victory, we have to be clear about what has been accomplished.

The Democratic Scare

Negative opinions about Russia are bipartisan and will have to be countered by a bipartisan strategy.

A Summit Scant Remembered

The world's attention, and deservedly so, has been focused this April on the 20th anniversary of the accident at Chernobyl, when a nuclear power reactor exploded in flames and contaminated an enormous swath of Ukraine, Belarus and Russia.

Presidents Take the Stage for Different Shows

Tuesday saw the repeat of a curious phenomenon: The president of the United States and the president of the Russian Federation each took to the stage to talk about his country's condition.

Brains Can Temper Muscle Power

Lately, Russia has used more muscle than brain in its foreign policy. The gas crisis with Ukraine over New Year's was a good example of muscle applied when a little brain power might have paid higher dividends.

A Promising Direction for G8 Leadership

At the close of the Gleneagles Summit this week, Russia will take over leadership of the Group of Eight, the ""super club"" of countries that in theory are driving the world economy and political system. Even prior to Moscow's ascension, that notion had been coming in for increasing derision. What about India and China? commentators have been asking. And why should Canada, hardly an international powerhouse, get a seat at the table?

The Unexpected Nonproliferation Partner

Last week was a bad one for nuclear nonproliferation. North Korea announced that it had acquired nuclear weapons and had no intention of returning to the six-party multilateral negotiations where the United States and regional neighbors China, Russia, Japan and South Korea have been working to convince North Korea to end its nuclear program.

Neutralize Nuclear Subs

Most aging shorter-range submarines still have their nuclear fuel and nuclear waste on board, and many are tied up at docks that are at best lightly guarded.

A Nuclear Deal That Worked

After months at the table with Russia and the United States, the Ukrainians let their 1,900 warheads go to Russia for destruction.

Partners in Preventing Nuclear Proliferation?

To a rogue state or terrorist trying to get nuclear weapons, Ukraine must look pretty good right now.

From Summits to Sleepovers

As President Bush left Russia last month his entourage breathed a sigh of relief and self-congratulation.