Articles by Jeff Grocott



Taking the Road More Traveled By

""Casino Moscow: A Tale of Greed and Adventure on Capitalism's Wildest Frontier"" promises a juicy tale of the Wild East and an inside look at Russia's golden age of excess.

Taking the Road More Traveled By

""Casino Moscow: A Tale of Greed and Adventure on Capitalism's Wildest Frontier"" promises a juicy tale of the Wild East and an inside look at Russia's golden age of excess.

Polaroid Adjusts Its Focus in Russian Market

Automakers Skeptical Of Tax Breaks

Central Bank Challenges Foreign Payment Practices

Efes Set to Tap Russian Beer Market

Hotels, Hulks & Homicide

Fund Lets Small Players Ride Big Market Wave

Novinsky Garden Office Nears Delivery Date

1997 Comes in like a bull

Russian Beer Takes on the World

Exporters, Prepare for Lawsuits

Smolensky Passage Set for Birthday Unveiling

Financing First: Avant-Garde Office Hits Market

Apartment Sales Prices Fell for First Time in '96

Apartment Rental Cheaper At Last

British Police Arrest 3 Suspects In Market Seminar Fraud Case

Trump in 'Preliminary' Talks on Rossia, Moskva

Buildings Booming in City's Future 'Mayfair'

Trump Lays Bet on New Moscow Skyline

Trump Tours Sites for Luxury Towers

Moscow Office Space: The Worst Is Over

Can Russia's Air Producers Fight Back?

British Brewers Tap Russian Market

Russian Networks Race for the Sky

Three new start-up television networks are using a mixture of cable and satellite to offer an alternative to Russia's established channels. Alexander Chernykh and Jeff Grocott ask whether the networks can find subscribers, viewers and advertisers. After years of watching ""Swan Lake"" and the same handful of old Soviet movies, viewers across Russia will be treated in the next few months to a spate of alternative programming, coming to them over a rush of new channels. A wave of new broadcasters are now being launched that will beam into households across Russia by satellite dish, via cable, and even through the old-fashioned rabbit-ear antennas that once only pulled in the signals of the country's stolid national television channels. The first channel of a planned $170 million, five-channel NTV-Plus network began broadcasting via satellite Sept. 2.

Berezovsky Has Inside Track on Sibneft

New Law, Same Old Corruption

Seattle Launches Far East Invasion

Slim Chances for Scam Victims

Nestle Kicks Off Push for 'Gold'

Estimating that the market for premium coffees in Russia will double in the next two years, Nestle Foods is brewing up a plan to draw more of Russia's caffeine-seekers to its instant Nescafe Gold brand. ""Nescafe Gold is the most recognized and best selling premium coffee in Russia,"" Nestle Russia marketing director Bernard Meunier told a press conference Tuesday, kicking off an ""aggressive"" promotion campaign to expand the brand's niche in a nation of more than 100 million coffee drinkers. Meunier declined to say how much Nestle would spend on the countrywide marketing campaign, which will include television and print spots, but said the company spends $20 million annually advertising its products in Russia. The stakes for the Russian coffee market are no small beans: 83 percent of Russians drink coffee at least once a month with 44 percent drinking it daily, making it the nation's second favorite beverage after tea, Meunier said, citing a report by Gallup Media.