Articles by Carlotta Gall



Pakistanis Took Part in Afghanistan Bombings

  • 16 February 06
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Arrests and interrogations of suspects in a recent series of suicide bombings in Afghanistan show that the attacks have been orchestrated from Pakistan by members of the ousted Taliban government with little interference by Pakistani authorities, Afghan officials say.

Afghan Vote Observers Find Fraud

  • 04 October 05
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Election officials and observers said Sunday that with 80 percent of the ballots counted in Afghanistan's national and provincial elections, they had found significant incidents of fraud.

As Vote Nears, Afghan Youth Drawn to Politics

  • 16 September 05
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Young Afghans, hoping to improve education, plan to vote in Sunday's elections.

Afghanistan Braces for Violence

  • 23 August 05
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
This year is already the deadliest for U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan since the war of 2001, and the violence is likely to intensify ahead of the nation's legislative elections on Sept. 18.

Kabul Fights to Save Heritage

  • 28 June 05
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Kabul was once a fabled city of gardens and fruit orchards beloved by the Mogul emperor Babur and serenaded by Persian poets, but little of its glorious past is evident today.

Afghan Constitution Blocks Cabinet Picks

  • 21 December 04
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Two weeks after his inauguration, Afghan President Hamid Karzai is encountering difficulties in forming a new Cabinet.

A Hoard of Gold That Afghanistan Quietly Saved

  • 29 June 04
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Under the Russians it was barely glimpsed. The Afghan Communists allowed only peeks. Through the years of civil war and Taliban rule, its existence was kept secret by a handful of unassuming museum and bank workers, even as other priceless pieces of Afghanistan's cultural history were destroyed.

Afghan Police Officer Tells of U.S. Abuse

  • 13 May 04
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
A former Afghan police colonel gave a graphic account in an interview this week of being subjected to beating, kicking, sleep deprivation, taunts and sexual abuse during about 40 days he spent in U.S. custody last summer.

Afghanistan 'Now Open for Business'

  • 20 April 04
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
President Hamid Karzai, putting aside concerns about persistent security problems around the nation, turned his attention to business this weekend.

Afghan Leaders Face Warlords' Expansion

  • 13 April 04
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
As often of late, Afghan President Hamid Karzai met long into the evening Sunday with ministers and advisers on how to deal with the clashes that have flared in the past three weeks, first in the country's west and then in the north.

Prisoners Recollect Guantanamo Bay

  • 18 June 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Afghans and Pakistanis who were detained for many months by the U.S. military at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba before being released without charges are describing the conditions as so desperate that some captives tried to kill themselves.

Dispatches From the Chechen Front

Anna Politkovskaya and Anne Nivat have given us two great pieces of journalism from Chechnya's war.

Dispatches From the Chechen Front

Anna Politkovskaya and Anne Nivat have given us two great pieces of journalism from Chechnya's war.

Pacolli Admits Credit Card Role

Cornered Maskhadov Ready to Fight

Missiles Hit Villagers Indiscriminately

Departing Jackson Says Kosovo Not Army's Job

Both Sides Are Ready to Fight for Dagestan

Report Links Violence to KLA

Monitors Feel Guilt After Abandoning Kosovo

THE GREAT GAME: A Sad Farewell Is Full of Hope For Caucasus

THE GREAT GAME: Baku Buzzes With Its Own Health Scare

THE GREAT GAME: Smug Rulers Play for Keeps In Kazakhstan

THE GREAT GAME: Season Can't Shake Baku's Depression

THE GREAT GAME: Warmongers Cheer Tragedy In Chechnya

The fallout from last week's killings in Chechnya has been so wide and varied that there is little sense to be made of it. And comments I heard over lunch in Moscow a few days ago made me realize how things go round and round in circles here and never change. For the first time in ages I heard talk of the party of war. Here we are, four years after a politician coined the phrase to describe the pro-war clique then surrounding President Boris Yeltsin, and two years after their war in Chechnya ended in defeat, the warmongers are still kicking. Moreover, after the three Britons and the New Zealander were so brutally murdered last week, they are ""jubilant,"" as my lunch companion, a well-known Russian analyst, said. Politicians, bureaucrats and, no doubt, many in the military were glad to see foreigners get their just deserts in Chechnya. Serves them right for championing the Chechens and for their stupid liberal thinking, they are saying. In many ways it suits Russia to watch Chechnya implode in violence.

THE GREAT GAME: Slayings Point To Chechnya's Inner Struggle

Chechnya. Oh God. It never fails to come back and strike you in the heart. And the horror only seems to grow. Of all the horrible things I have seen down there, the picture of the four heads, lined up on a cloth on a bleak roadside, was exceptionally chilling. I savaged the British Embassy in Moscow last time I wrote about hostages in Chechnya. I still stand by what I wrote, but no one could have foreseen this one and I pity them having to try to find answers for the relatives back in England. Foreigners have always been out of their depth in Chechnya but never more so than now. The Chechens, even good friends, will not come clean on this one for at least a year. It was like that with the death of the American Fred Cuny and the Red Cross workers. The real details only started emerging after a year or two.

THE GREAT GAME: Kyrgyz Bear Their Poverty With Dignity

THE GREAT GAME: Kazakh Khan Risks Nothing In Ballot Race

THE GREAT GAME: Glitz Cannot Hide Terror In Uzbekistan

THE GREAT GAME: Thugs Dictate A Capricious Tajik 'Peace'