Articles by Serge Schmemann



Dmitry Whatever

I saw it coming as soon as Tim Russert cornered Senator Hillary Clinton into naming President Vladimir Putin's heir. She dodged, ducked and plunged into the now famous: ""Um, Med-medvedova, whatever.""

Vodka by Any Other Name

A lot has been said lately about how the European Union has staved off war on its continent since the signing of the Treaty of Rome 50 years ago.

Still Fighting World War II

There was a lot of talk 10 years ago, when the 50th anniversary of the end of World War II was being celebrated, that the great war was finally over.

Running Out of Arguments for Putin's Russia

On Friday night, I got a call from Moscow: my friend Paul Klebnikov, the editor in chief of Forbes Russia, had been fatally shot as he left work.

Art, the State and Religion

The story from Russia, briefly, was this: In January 2003, the Andrei Sakharov Museum in Moscow held an exhibition of new art called ""Caution -- Religion.""

Yury Gagarin And China's First Spaceman

  • 24 October 03
  • The New York Times
I don't know how many of them remain, but when I was a correspondent in the Soviet Union in the 1980s, there wasn't a single city, town or even village across the entire 11 time zones that didn't have a Gagarin Street.

Window to What End?

  • 02 June 03
  • The New York Times
As President George W. Bush and other world leaders descended on St. Petersburg to help President Vladimir Putin celebrate the city's tricentennial (and to help his re-election campaign), it was clear that their canned speeches would contain lots of references to a ""window into Europe.""

'Natasha's Dance': On the Struggle for Russia's Soul

  • 15 November 02
  • New York Times News Service
I once received a letter from Richard Nixon in response to a story I'd written about a Soviet collective farm, in which he related how he had developed an early interest in Russia while reading Lev Tolstoy's ""Anna Karenina"" in college.

'Natasha's Dance': On the Struggle for Russia's Soul

  • 15 November 02
  • New York Times News Service
I once received a letter from Richard Nixon in response to a story I'd written about a Soviet collective farm, in which he related how he had developed an early interest in Russia while reading Lev Tolstoy's ""Anna Karenina"" in college.

The Chechen Jihad: How Global Is It?

  • 28 October 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
When Chechen commandos seized a theater with 700 people inside on Wednesday night, the echoes of Sept. 11 came loud and fast. International terrorism had struck again -- or so it seemed.

U.S. Seeks Compromise Over Court

  • 12 July 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Under severe criticism from some of its closest allies for demanding immunity for American peacekeepers from the new International Criminal Court, the United States offered a compromise.

Palestinian Infrastructure Ravaged

  • 12 April 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Two weeks ago, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon sent his forces into the West Bank to ""uproot the infrastructure of terror.""

U.S. Envoy Pursues Cease-Fire Goal

  • 18 March 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
The U.S. mediator, General Anthony Zinni, shuttled between Palestinian and Israeli leaders on Saturday and Sunday, reportedly seeking to bring leaders of the two sides together to prepare for a cease-fire.

Nostalgia Feeds Taste for Soviet Era

Road to Peace in Kosovo Will Be Rocky

Communists March to Same Old Beat

Hebron Eviction Fans Old Flames