Articles by Celestine Bohlen



Putin Lends Support to an Old Friend in Need

  • 08 September 05
  • Bloomberg
President Vladimir Putin this week becomes the last foreign leader to visit Berlin before a Sept. 18 election that polls indicate will cost his closest Western ally, German Chancellor Gerhard Schröder, his job.

French Farmers Fight to Keep Way of Life

  • 30 August 05
  • Bloomberg
Francois Fihue's dairy farm in the Normandy region of northern France gets only 20 percent of its annual revenue from selling milk.

A 'Repatriated' Tolstoy Finds Herself at Home

  • 13 January 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Tatyana Tolstaya, best known as a short story writer and an essayist, began writing her first and only novel in 1986, which, in Russian terms, was long, long ago in a place that is now far, far away.

Riding Out the Storms at The Pushkin

  • 06 December 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Irina Antonova's 41-year career at the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts began one month before the end of World War II and has survived Stalinism, democracy and everything in between.

Riding Out the Storms at The Pushkin

  • 06 December 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Irina Antonova's 41-year career at the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts began one month before the end of World War II and has survived Stalinism, democracy and everything in between.

Bush Gets a Dostoevsky Primer

  • 21 May 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
U.S. President George W. Bush told Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov he is preparing for his first trip to Russia by reading the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky, the 19th-century author whose works explored the dark recesses of the Russian soul.

The Lord of the Dance Takes N.Y.

  • 29 March 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
In the Soviet Union of the late 1970s, Boris Eifman was an exception -- a young, ambitious choreographer who had his own dance company, then known as the Leningrad Ballet Ensemble.

The Lord of the Dance Takes N.Y.

  • 29 March 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
In the Soviet Union of the late 1970s, Boris Eifman was an exception -- a young, ambitious choreographer who had his own dance company, then known as the Leningrad Ballet Ensemble.

34 Smuggled Icons Return to Church

  • 21 May 01
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
NEW YORK — The U.S. Customs Service has returned to the Russian Orthodox Church a cache of 34 valuable icons that had been smuggled out of Russia and were seized by customs agents just as they were about to be sold by a Utah bookseller in 1993. The collection of icons, most from the 19th century, is valued at more than $3 million and is the largest ever seized in the United States, according to the Customs Service. With the consent of the Russian government, they were repatriated to the St. Nicholas Russian Orthodox Cathedral on East 97th Street in Manhattan, a church belonging to the Moscow Patriarchate. ""One can't put a price tag on treasures of such religious and cultural significance,'' said John Varrone, the assistant commissioner of the Customs Service. The cathedral's bishop, Mercurius of Zaraisk, formally accepted the icons at a ceremony Thursday. ""We as a church rejoice in the work of U.S. customs agents,'' he said.

Amber Room Mosaic to Come Home

IMF Poised For New Relations With Russia

Regions Warily Awaiting Putin Win

Mothers Teach Art of Draft Dodging

Growing Chorus Doubts War's Toll

Tycoon Reinvents Himself as Duma Candidate

Russia Stuck in IMF's Bad Books

A Pushkin Oasis in Moscow's Heart

Key Witness in Bribery Case Implicates Yeltsin

Chinese Thrive in Ailing Russian Farm Sector

Brother, Can You Spare a Ruble for Mir?

Hermitage Wired for New Millennium

Russians Immune to Pushkin Overdose

Yeltsin Shows Enemies the Boss Is Back

Feeding Inmates' Tots Is Constant Fight

Jew-Baiting and Nationalism Give Easy Answers

U.S. Steel Ban Death Knell for Magnitogorsk

Russia's Humor Thriving in Crisis

Middle Class' Party Ends as Crisis Grows

Software Company Copes With Debt Crisis