Articles by Michael Wines



In Zimbabwe, It's Pass the Buck

  • 10 August 06
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
For years, Zimbabweans have stoically accepted the convolutions of government economic policies that, most experts agree, have led to quadruple-digit inflation and impoverishment.

S. Africans Rushing to Townships

  • 08 June 06
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Whoops: too late. 21 Jonkerhoek was just snapped up for 140,000 rand, or about $21,000.

Zimbabweans Reeling as Inflation Exceeds 900%

  • 03 May 06
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Sky-high prices have transformed goods like tea and bread into luxury items.

Tourists Help Africa's Cheetahs

  • 29 July 05
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Roused from his lair in the knee-high grass of the Namibian bush, Dewey the cheetah lifted his head toward his latest clutch of gaping humans, maybe 30 feet away, and offered a contemptuous stare of the sort that only cats deliver.

Mugabe Wins Key Victory in Elections

  • 04 April 05
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
But the opposition says the vote was rigged even before the poll was held.

Mugabe's Zimbabwe Prepares for Elections

  • 24 March 05
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
If this is an outpost of tyranny, it was not immediately obvious in this one-road backwater buried in Zimbabwe's hilly southwest flank.

Tourism Tug-of-War at Zambian Border

  • 22 June 04
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
With a name like that, one would think this town would have no trouble attracting tourists.

Forest Brother Survives Bunkers and Gulag

  • 27 August 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Kaarmann is one of the last of the so-called Forest Brothers, the bands of Baltic-state guerrillas regarded as heroic figures here for spending years, even decades, in hiding from Soviet forces, who wrested Estonia from the Nazis.

Sculpting Giants, Watching Them Fall

  • 18 June 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Among the many distinctions he has racked up in his 85 years -- hero of Socialist labor, Goethe Prize laureate, winner of the Lenin Prize -- there is one that Lev Kerbel would just as well forget: excepting perhaps Saddam Hussein's sculptor, it is doubtful that any other living artist has seen as many of his or her works wrecked by mobs.

Sure Hand Abroad, Troubles at Home

  • 29 May 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
For all his stature abroad, Putin is looking increasingly vulnerable at home, facing growing fears that his dominance of the state machinery has peaked.

Prospectors Look for Right to Strike It Rich

  • 27 May 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
A dozen years after capitalism swept in, Russia remains perhaps the only place on earth where a prospector can hunt for gold with barely a dream of getting wealthy.

Reports Defy Claims of Calmer Chechnya

  • 15 April 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Statistics about violence in Chechnya detail a parade of disappearances, killings and beatings that run contrary to Russian government assertions that life in Chechnya is slowly returning to normal.

Petersburg Summit Pushes for UN Role

  • 14 April 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Heads of the three nations that led opposition to the war in Iraq called for a broad effort under United Nations control to rebuild the shattered country but warned that the immediate tasks of quelling anarchy and preventing a civil catastrophe fell on the United States and Britain.

A Mission of Hope High on a Mountain

  • 01 April 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
High on the shoulders of the southwestern Caucasus Mountains, Konstantin Dzherapov and dozens of other rescue workers are sinking a 22-story hole.

Study Supports Idea Stalin Was Poisoned

  • 06 March 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Fifty years after Josef Stalin died, felled by a brain hemorrhage at his dacha, an exhaustive study of long-secret Soviet records lends new weight to an old theory that he was actually poisoned, perhaps to avert a looming war with the United States.

It Wheezes but It Was Tchaikovsky's

  • 04 March 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Gazing on Tchaikovsky's piano here, a polished behemoth eight octaves wide and as long as an Oldsmobile's hood, one can almost imagine the composer in his youth.

American Outlives Stalin's Legacy

  • 27 February 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
When David Natanovich Bell first applied for a visa to visit the United States, at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow in October 1987, the consular official took one brief look at his Soviet passport and one long look at him. She left the room, then returned with her boss. ""So,"" they asked him, ""do you want to renew your American citizenship?""

Russia Plays Waiting Game on UN Swing Vote

  • 14 February 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
With some deft diplomatic maneuvering in Berlin and Paris, President Vladimir Putin vaulted Russia this week into the unexpected position of being the potential swing vote in a looming United Nations debate over military action against Iraq.

In Prices, Euro Is New Dollar

  • 04 February 03
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Russia's official money is the ruble, but it takes only a stroll through an auto dealership, a pricey restaurant or a classy jewelry store here to learn which currency is truly king.

Jailhouse Beauty Pageant Captivates Lithuania

  • 27 November 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Last week, the Miss Captivity Pageant became the runaway hit of the Lithuanian broadcast season.

Belarus Faiths Come Under Fire

  • 26 November 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
In Belarus, Hindus who gather together in their gods' names are, by definition, almost always in violation of the law.

Moscow Parks Coming Up Short on Squirrels

  • 12 November 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
In the sprawling metropolis of 10 million people and some 700 square kilometers, city officials say there are but 200 squirrels.

U.S. Curbs Aid to Kiev Over Sale to Iraq

  • 25 September 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
The United States has concluded that Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma personally approved a plan in July 2000 to sell Iraq an advanced radar system.

The Kick in the Fruit Punch Could Be Atomic

  • 17 September 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Good news for Muscovites! ""There are practically no cases of radioactive watermelons this year,"" said Andrei Buyanov.

Political Slayings Smell of Money

  • 28 August 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Americans like to call their politics a blood sport. They should come to Moscow, where, to a worrisome degree, that is more than just a metaphor.

Drinking Horse Milk for a Kick

  • 23 July 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Horse milk is tasty enough -- thick, foamy and so much sweeter than cow's milk that even a single cup seems leavened with spoonfuls of sugar.

Putin and Bush Sign Off on Treaty of Moscow

  • 27 May 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
In a day devoted to celebrating what U.S. President George W. Bush called ""an entirely new relationship"" with Russia, he and President Vladimir Putin signed a treaty on Friday to commit their nations to the most dramatic nuclear cuts in decades, while both men tried to smooth over a disagreement about continued Russian exports of nuclear technology to Iran.

Accord to Give Russia Just a Foot in NATO Door

  • 24 April 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Five months after they began talking about it, Russia and NATO are on the lip of an agreement to give the Kremlin a real, if limited, say in the policies of its old Atlantic enemy. Russian leaders are openly delighted.

Abkhazia's Refugees Make Do

  • 17 April 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
From her balcony, Larisa Mebonia can see the Kura River winding through stands of sycamores. To her left is Rustaveli Avenue, Tbilisi's grandest downtown boulevard.

Cars Are Weapon of Choice in Ukraine

  • 10 April 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
UkraineТs leading politicians are dying, or cheating death, in car crashes Ч one last year, two so far this year Ч and always, it seems, in a political crisis or showdown.