Articles by Joseph Kahn



China's Threat Level Rises on Missile Test

  • 22 January 07
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
China's apparent success in destroying one of its own orbiting satellites with a ballistic missile signals that its rising military intends to contest U.S. supremacy in space, a realm many here consider increasingly crucial to national security.

China Condemns Nuclear Test

  • 10 October 06
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
North Korea's actions garner an unusually strong reaction from its main benefactor and only ally.

Ancient Map Could Change History

  • 18 January 06
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
A prominent Chinese lawyer and collector unveiled an old map on Monday that he and some supporters say should topple one of the central tenets of Western civilization: that Europeans were the first to sail around the world and discover America.

Politics Still Reign in China's Communist Courts

  • 22 September 05
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
For three days and three nights, the police wrenched Qin Yanhong's arms high above his back, jammed his knees into a sharp metal frame, and kicked his gut whenever he fell asleep.

China on Global Energy Hunt

  • 28 June 05
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
From the dusty plains of East Africa to the shores of the Caspian Sea, China is seeking to loosen the grip of the United States on world energy resources and secure the fuel it needs to keep its economy in overdrive.

Worker, Peasant, Businessman

China's leaders are clearing the path for entrepreneurs to join the Communist Party, which Jiang Zemin says should represent capitalists as much as it does workers and peasants. But the new trend, as The New York Times reports, is blurring the class distinctions that once formed the backbone of Beijing's ideology.

Bush Mulls Moves to Stem Foreign Steel

  • 05 March 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
U.S. President George W. Bush's top economic advisers have presented him with proposals to aid the domestic steel industry that would most heavily penalize China, Japan, Germany, Taiwan and South Korea but exempt most poor nations -- and Mexico and Canada -- from punishing export taxes.

Accounting World Prepares Overhaul

  • 15 February 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Responding to the collapse of the Enron Corp., U.S. regulators, legislators and the chief accounting rulemaker proposed changes in the way companies do business and report their finances, including closing the loophole Enron used to hide hundreds of millions of dollars of debt and inflate its profits.

Collapse Raises Regulatory Issues

  • 04 December 01
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Enron may have just filed for bankruptcy, but the millions of dollars it lavished on political allies helped transform the way Washington supervises -- and has often chosen not to supervise -- the $200 billion power industry.

Integration Means Global Slump

  • 26 November 01
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
With U.S. economic malaise spreading as seamlessly as the technology-driven surge that preceded it, many economists now agree that the world is suffering its first recession in two decades and that recovery may come more slowly than once expected.

U.S. Officials, Bankers Discuss Terror Money

  • 22 October 01
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
U.S. government and banking industry officials are working on a plan to allow banks to serve as a front line for law enforcement in detecting financial transactions by terrorist groups, people involved in the effort have said.

Bush Takes First Steps to Restrict Steel Imports

  • 07 June 01
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
WASHINGTON — U.S. President George W. Bush took the first steps Tuesday toward imposing broad restrictions on imported steel, handing a victory to American steel companies and unions that have long urged the government to grant relief from foreign competition. Bush said he had decided to ask the U.S. International Trade Commission for a ""full investigation"" into whether current levels of imports are harmful to U.S. producers. The president's decision, which could result in higher tariffs on foreign-made steel within months, goes beyond any protections that former President Bill Clinton's administration offered the industry and is certain to raise tensions with trading partners. Administration officials said the decision came after a study of the steel industry's woes.

UN Asks Business To Protect Workers

No Proof Bank Exec Passed Secrets

World Bank Drops $160M Tibet Plan

World Bank Scolded For Chinese Project

Credit Suisse Eyed Over IMF Loans to Ukraine

IMF Report Mars Ukraine-U.S. Ties

Congress Task Force Seeks New IMF, Bank

U.S. Plans to Assault Money Laundering

Clinton Opts to Veto Europe's IMF Choice

Europeans Support German IMF Candidate

Clinton Changes Trade Tack in Election Year

U.S. Seeks UN Help Over Air Noise Spat With EU

U.S. Says It Won't Block Aid Despite Chechnya

Wall St. Pays Financiers $13Bln Bonus

Do the Deal and Get Out