Articles by Kurt Eichenwald



'Lone Insider' Helped Fell Enron

  • 18 June 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Evidence introduced at the criminal trial of Arthur Andersen indicates for the first time that an improper accounting decision , which set in motion Enron's destruction, served mainly to benefit the financial interests of a single corporate insider.

Andersen Admits to Obstruction Charge

  • 12 April 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Pushed by the decision of a former partner to plead guilty to obstruction of justice in the Enron investigation, Arthur Andersen has reached the outlines of a settlement with the U.S. government for both criminal and civil charges stemming from the collapse of its former client, people involved in the case said Wednesday.

Struggling Andersen Looks for Buyer

  • 12 March 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Arthur Andersen, facing the defection of employees and clients as it struggles under the weight of a potential criminal indictment, is in negotiations to sell itself to another Big Five accounting firm, Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu, and an announcement of a deal could come as soon as this week, people involved in the discussions said.

The Two Faces of Enron

  • 11 February 02
  • The New York Times
One year ago, Enron was riding high as one of America's most successful corporations -- on the outside. Beneath the surface lay a series of byzantine partnerships and financial strategies that would eventually collapse and bring the once-proud energy-trading giant to its knees.

Enron Probe Takes Unique Turn

  • 11 January 02
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
Widening the potential scope of the criminal investigation into the Enron Corp., the U.S. Justice Department plans to form a special task force of prosecutors from across the country to conduct the inquiry into the company and its eventual collapse, government officials said Wednesday.

Terror Cash Difficult to Block, Say Officials

  • 11 December 01
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
In Afghanistan, the hunt for Osama bin Laden is narrowing. But on the war's financial front, the U.S. government is only now starting to come to grips with al-Qaida's money-raising apparatus, which officials say is so far-flung and diversified that it could survive even if bin Laden is captured or killed.

U.S. Officials, Bankers Discuss Terror Money

  • 22 October 01
  • NEW YORK TIMES SERVICE
U.S. government and banking industry officials are working on a plan to allow banks to serve as a front line for law enforcement in detecting financial transactions by terrorist groups, people involved in the effort have said.