Law, Finance Top Best Jobs List

MTSoldiers reported a large growth in job satisfaction, with their rating rising to 70 in December from 54 in August.��
If you're choosing a career in Russia, take note: Hitherto lucrative fields like energy and real estate are out, while formerly neglected civil service occupations are back in -- at least as far as job satisfaction is concerned.

Military personnel, police and firefighters reported the biggest growth in job contentment, while energy industry workers and realtors enjoyed their work the least, according to a survey released Monday by state-run pollster VTsIOM.

The survey compares the change in job satisfaction in 65 professions from August to December, with over 4,000 respondents asked to rate their job satisfaction on a scale from -100, for complete dissatisfaction, to 100, for complete satisfaction.

The top spot in the December poll was taken by lawyers, who reported a job satisfaction rating of 80. A significant rise in job satisfaction was also reported by police, firefighters, military personnel and radio engineers.

Despite the economic crisis, finance professionals ranked second with an average job satisfaction ranking of 75 -- a number unchanged since the August survey, where they took the top position.

"Finance professionals are highly paid, and there is a lot of social prestige tied to their profession, which could explain the consistently high rating," Olga Kamenchuk, VTsIOM's communications director, said Monday.

Job Satisfaction

Top 10Aug.Dec.
Lawyers62.380.0
Financiers7575
Programmers/
IT specialists
68.274
Hair stylists72.572.2
Military personnel53.970
Radio technologists/
engineers
16.770
Firefighters43.870
Police47.368.4
Economists61.766.1
Bank employees68.264.3
Bottom 5  
Librarians554.5
Mail carriers0-2.8
Bartenders/Wait staff-33.3-12.5
Movers-25-14.3
Yard workers-23.5-29.9
Source: VTsIOM
Military personnel's job satisfaction rating rose to 70 from 54 in August, while that of firefighters climbed to 70 from 44. Police also reported more contentment with their job, with a rating of 68, up from 47.

The increased job satisfaction of professionals in government service is in part because of the ongoing financial turmoil, the pollster said.

"In uncertain financial times, government service jobs become more prestigious because they offer more security, less worry," Kamenchuk said. "These are jobs that will always be needed, regardless of the economic picture."

Several once-rewarding professions saw big declines. Energy industry employees polled at 34, down from 70 in August. Realtors, meanwhile, reported a job satisfaction rating of 33, down from 53.

Oil prices have fallen nearly 70 percent from a high in August, while the real estate and construction industries have been paralyzed by a dearth of liquidity and financing.

"Our survey last year found that the sector university graduates most wanted to work in was energy," Kamenchuk said. "Now, when faced with the choice between a big paycheck and stability, most people will choose stability."

Other big movers to the upside included plumbers, radio engineers, stonemasons and cashiers. Job satisfaction fell among those working in agriculture, crane operators and bank workers.