News in Brief

Ballistic Missile Test Fired



The military has test fired a new intercontinental ballistic missile, a spokesman for the Strategic Missile Forces said Wednesday.

The RS-24 missile lifted off from a mobile launcher at the Plesetsk launch pad in northern Russia, spokesman Alexander Vovk said.

The missile's warheads hit the designated targets at the Kura testing range in the far eastern Kamchatka Peninsula on Wednesday, Vovk said.

It was the third test launch of the new missile, which is intended to gradually replace the Soviet-built intercontinental ballistic missiles that still form the core of Russia's nuclear arsenal.

Military officials have boasted that the RS-24 would be able to penetrate any prospective missile defense. (AP)




Space Cargo Ship Launched



A modernized cargo ship has been launched to deliver supplies to the international space station, Russian Mission Control said Wednesday.

The unmanned Progress M-01M cargo ship has a new main computer and features a fully digital telemetric system along with other improvements, Mission Control spokesman Valery Lyndin said.

The Soyuz-U booster rocket carrying the ship lifted off as scheduled Wednesday from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Lyndin said. The ship is set to dock at the station Sunday, he said.

The cargo ship is delivering more than 2.5 tons of fuel, oxygen and equipment along with water, food and gifts for the crew, Lyndin said. (AP)




Premier's Remains Exhumed



Polish scientists have exhumed the remains of the country's World War II premier after the institute responsible for investigating Nazi and communist crimes said he may have been murdered by the Soviet Union.

Wladyslaw Sikorski, who headed the Polish government in exile in London after the war broke out in 1939, died on July 4, 1943, when the plane he was traveling in crashed shortly after taking off from the British territory of Gibraltar.

British authorities, who repatriated Sikorski's remains in 1993, saw nothing suspicious in his death, but Poland's Institute of National Remembrance says it has reason to think Soviet dictator Josef Stalin ordered Sikorski to be murdered. (Bloomberg)