News in Brief

Solzhenitsyn Street



The Moscow City Duma decided Wednesday to bend municipal law and rename Bolshaya Kommunisticheskaya Ulitsa into Ulitsa Solzhenitsyna without waiting for 10 years to pass after his death, Interfax reported.

Deputies from the United Russia majority voted Wednesday to lift the 10-year provision if a presidential decree had been signed calling for someone to be recognized. Nobel laureate writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn died Aug. 3, and President Dmitry Medvedev urged Moscow to rename a street after him in a decree issued three days later.

Communists and residents of Bolshaya Kommunisticheskaya Ulitsa protested at the Duma on Wednesday.

Moscow authorities previously violated the law by renaming a street after slain Chechen President Akhmad Kadyrov. 0(MT)

Volkwagen Sued Over Crash

A woman is suing German carmaker Volkswagen for $20,000 over injuries sustained in a car crash that killed popular radio DJ Gennady Bachinsky and another woman in January, Komsomolskaya Pravda reported Wednesday.

Tatyana Osipova said she was unable to work after Bachinsky's VW Golf ran into the minivan she was riding. Volkswagen said only the car owner should be held responsible in the crash. (MT)




'Puting' Case Closed



Prosecutors in the Vladimir region have closed a criminal case against local television channel accused of insulting Prime Minister Vladimir Putin by referring to a rally in his support as a "puting," the Regnum news agency reported Wednesday.

Linguistics experts from the Interior Ministry and Justice Ministry examined th report on Vladimir's TV-6 and decided that it carried no negative remarks about Putin and his supporters. (MT)




For the Record



Dissident Russian journalists could be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize this year to highlight the dangers of the profession, two Norwegian observers of the prize said Wednesday. (Reuters)

Inmates rioted at a Samara prison late Tuesday and set buildings on fire, injuring 34 prisoners and guards. (AP)

A Federal Broadcasting Competition Commission unanimously recommended the extension of 2x2 television's broadcast license Wednesday despite prosecutors' complaints that it airs "South Park" and other cartoons they deem harmful to children. (MT)