Detainees Did Not Hear Rights

GUANTANAMO BAY NAVAL BASE, Cuba -- A former FBI agent testifying at the first Guantanamo war crimes trial said interrogators did not advise detainees here of any rights because the military prison is dedicated to intelligence gathering, not law enforcement.

Ali Soufan, an al-Qaida expert and star witness for the prosecution, said Tuesday that the Guantanamo Bay Navy base is the only place in the world where he has not informed suspects of a right against self-incrimination.

"The way it was explained to us is Guantanamo Bay is an intelligence collection point," he said.

Defense lawyers asked the judge in Salim Hamdan's trial to throw out all the Guantanamo interrogations, arguing that intelligence-gathering sessions should not be used against him in court. But Judge Keith Allred, a Navy captain, ruled Monday that constitutional protections against self-incrimination do not apply to the man declared an "enemy combatant."

Hamdan, a former driver for Osama bin Laden, is charged with conspiracy and aiding terrorism. His lawyers have cast him as a low-level employee of the terrorist leader without any role in al-Qaida.