Mbeki Calls In Army to Halt Attacks

JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- The army was deployed Thursday to help quell anti-foreigner violence that has killed at least 42 people and shredded South Africa's reputation as the continent's economic and political bastion of stability.

Government officials said they were working with international aid agencies to help repatriate terrified foreigners -- in particular Mozambicans.

Zimbabwe's opposition leader sought to calm his compatriots seeking sanctuary at a Johannesburg police station.

More than 13,000 foreigners have been forced out of their homes by the violence. At least 42 people have been killed, either burned alive, stabbed, shot or beaten to death. Images of the black-on-black violence have made front pages around the world and deeply embarrassed the government, whose own leaders sought refuge in neighboring countries during white rule.

Incidents of anti-foreigner violence continued to be reported in other parts of the country, including northern provinces near the borders with Mozambique and Zimbabwe.

President Thabo Mbeki finally gave the order late Wednesday to call in the South African National Defense Force -- for the first time since the end of apartheid in 1994.

Police, backed up by infantry battalion soldiers, made early morning swoops on three slums in downtown Johannesburg which was the scene of some of the worst attacks at the weekend.