Tsvangirai Accused of Treason

HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Zimbabwe's government accused opposition leader Morgan Tsvangirai of treason Thursday, saying he and enemy Britain are plotting an "illegal regime change" to oust the southern African nation's longtime ruler.

The accusation came as the government continued arrests, assaults and other intimidation following a March 29 vote that President Robert Mugabe is widely believed to have lost.

Zimbabweans have been waiting nearly three weeks for results of the presidential vote as riot police and security forces have deployed across the country in a show of force.

Independent tallies suggest Tsvangirai won, but not with enough votes to avoid a runoff. The electoral commission plans a recount of presidential votes on Saturday.

The opposition says it won outright, and accuses Mugabe of engineering a delay to keep his 28-year grip on power.

South Africa's opposition Democratic Alliance said South African parliamentarians had been invited to observe the recount, but that it was first seeking assurances that ballot boxes have not been tampered with and the results will be announced immediately.

Tsvangirai's party has failed in attempts to force the release of results through the courts and through appeals to regional leaders. The party has been reluctant to agree to a runoff, arguing that a second round would be rigged by Mugabe's cronies.