Double-Decker Eclectic

MTA View of the spacious main hall from Moscafe's cozy upper level.
Moscafe is the latest example of the flavor of the moment -- eclecticism. The new restaurant is the work of the restaurateurs responsible for the popular and inexpensive Soup, but the two really do not have much in common. Moscafe, with its interior a rich collage of various styles, is certainly more upmarket than the minimalist Soup.

Moscafe is a large restaurant with numerous small nooks and curtain-enclosed spaces off both the grand downstairs dining hall and the more intimate upstairs area that overlooks it. The main area is bright, with its large windows letting in plenty of light, but its most striking feature is the towering ceilings, among some of the highest in town. The decor features such disparate touches as richly patterned curtains, floral patterns around the walls, transparent candlestick holders and halogen lamps.

The menu is as eclectic as the interior, featuring an interesting blend of various cuisines. Starters begin at 215 rubles for a trout roll with ginger and ruccola and go up to 575 rubles for jamon Iberica with exotic fruits. Salads start at 188 rubles for an "ice" salad with fresh vegetables and reach up to 485 rubles for either a crab japano salad with pineapple or a blue fin tuna salad. The most inexpensive soup is a chicken consomme with handmade noodles for 152 rubles, while the most expensive is the gazpacho for 260 rubles. Mains include grilled salmon in a mussel sauce for 458 rubles and a pork brisket with zucchini ragout, 539 rubles. Naturally, there is a full Japanese section on the menu.

Draft beer starts at 162 rubles for a half-liter of Czech BB Budweiser, while Hoegaarden costs 215 rubles for 400 milliliters. And, as is becoming more and more common around town, Moscafe serves its own freshly made lemonades at 260 rubles for a 700-milliliter jug of ginger-grapefruit, berry or lemon-mint.

24 Leningradsky Prospekt, 933-1408, noon-midnight, Belorusskaya.